Thursday, June 16, 2016

MORE ABOUT "GUN CONTROL"




Perhaps of several most understood facts about guns is the Constitution’ framers intention with the 2nd Amendment My interpretation follows:

The provision of the 2nd Amendment reads "A well regulated Militia.being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

The key word is Militia in an age when there was no Federal Army etc. It does not say for individual use although that was implied when hunting and defense from hostile Indians was a way of life. Semi-automatic weapons are not needed for hunting just for slaughter and can be forbidden without ignoring the 2nd Amendment.

The other is what is an assault weapon?

This is copied from an article by Network Paul Giblin, wrote in The Arizona Republic on June 15, 2016

One of the weapons used in the Orlando nightclub tragedy is a type that's well-known and hotly debated, but even the terms used to describe it often become a point of contention in the wake of mass killings where it is used.

Traced to the shooting were a .223 caliber AR-type rifle and a 9 mm semiautomatic pistol, according to a Twitter post by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

AR-type rifles originated with a weapon called an AR-15, which was developed by ArmaLite Rifles and later popularized by Colt. "AR" is short for ArmaLite Rifles.

Colt reconfigured the design and sold a military version as the fully automatic M-16. The semiautomatic civilian version is the AR-15, which retains the external look and feel of a military weapon.

The key difference is the military M-16 — and its shorter modern successor the M-4 — can be fully automatic, meaning they can discharge a full magazine of rounds with a single pull of the trigger. Civilian AR-15 style rifles shoot a single round per pull.

The high-powered rifles can reload quickly by swapping out spent magazines, which typically hold 30 rounds of ammunition. Defining elements to both the military and civilian versions are they are lightweight and use a pistol grip and trigger assemblies.

AR-15 style weapons are produced by dozens of gun manufacturers worldwide. Various makers use different names for their rifles, but AR-15 and the shorter AR have become the generic terms for modern lightweight semiautomatic pistol-grip rifles.

They are legal in all 50 states, provided the purchaser passes mandatory FBI background checks required for all retail gun purchasers. Approximately 5 million to 10 million are legally owned in the United States, according to the foundation.

Some states have other restrictions on some of the weapon's features.

Debate continues about whether AR-15 style rifles should be considered "assault weapons" or "assault rifles."

The Shooting Sports Foundation, which calls them "modern sporting rifles," argues the guns don't meet the rapid-fire standard. "An assault rifle is fully automatic — a machine gun," the foundation states on its website.

"If someone calls an AR-15 style rifle an 'assault weapon,' he or she either supports banning these firearms or does not understand their function and sporting use, or both. Please correct them."

The legal standard for the terms vary by jurisdictions that enact laws using the terms.

Among the weapon's features: It's customizable, adaptable, reliable and accurate and can be used in sport shooting, hunting and self-defense situations, according to the post. They can be outfitted with a variety of stocks, barrels and sights.

Everything from the caliber of round to the colors and patterns on the stock can be changed.

"The AR-15's ability to be modified to your own personal taste is one of the things that make it so unique," the NRA states.

The rifle is modular, which makes customization fairly easy, he said. "It's a super common and popular rifle. That's why you hear about them in shootings, I'm assuming, because it's a popular rifle," Kimball said.

The weapons also are versatile, according to the Shooting Sports Foundation. They're known for accuracy, reliability and ruggedness.

Depending on the manufacturer and features, AR-15 style guns sell for $500 to $2,500 apiece, Kimball said.

While the ATF didn't name the manufacturer of the 9 mm handgun traced to the Orlando shooting, it showed a photo of a Glock in the Twitter post.

Those guns come in different varieties, but like AR-15 style rifles, they can be reloaded quickly by replacing spent magazines.

The Glock 17 is the most widely used law-enforcement pistol worldwide, according to the manufacturer. A standard magazine carries 17 rounds.

They sell for about $500.

I hope this helps.

14 comments:

  1. Knives kill 5 times as many people in the US every year than rifles (and the infamous AR type assault rifles) that the dems are so afraid of account for a very minuscule portion of these rifle deaths.
    http://thefederalist.com/2014/11/11/knives-kill-more-people-each-year-than-rifles-time-for-knife-control/

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    1. Blackdog - this is ridiculous to even mention. People need knives - people (other than military) don't need AR type weapons.

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    2. Blakdos, the Federalist is an anti-gay ultra right publication(?) by its own admission. I might question the accuracy and value of its statistics, Since the Ill. numbers are askew because of Chicago they are meaningless.

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    3. Typo:Blackdog not Blackdos

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    4. They got their stats from FBI report.

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    5. The ultra right is not anti gay, the DNC and islam is!

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    6. Blackdog - you have confirmed my suspicions - you are a fool and a clown as this statement is not even remotely accurate on a good day - and that is from a very well informed member of the LGBT community.

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    7. And all these years I thought that the ultra (religious) right was the bastion of anti-LBGT sentiment. Perhaps it is the liberal left?

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  2. Doc, you are right here. People in the US don't have the right to carry military style weapons of mass destruction and shouldn't. Keep your hunting rifles and hand guns and be happy you can have them. I've been a hunter for 50 years and have never felt I need an assault weapon.

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  3. I grew up with guns and very much am in favor of responsible people having guns... I will never be in favor of semi-automatic weapons being available to the public. I think RPG ( rocket propelled grenade ) launchers are cool...doesn't mean I should be allowed to have one.

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  4. Wait!!! I just saw a tank pull in my neighbor's driveway.

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    1. Are you sure you ain't TANKED? Lol

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  5. Hi Doc,

    Who is Kimball? You mentioned Network Paul Giblin earlier in your post and then quoted someone named Kimball without an attribution.

    Thanks,

    Tom Kaercher

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    Replies
    1. Bridger Kimball, co-owner of Caswells Shooting Range, quoted by Ciblin in his Op-Ed

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